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The Daily Register - Harrisburg, IL
  • Ledford man claims unique fuel mixture reduces auto emissions

  • LEDFORD -- John Mullinix of Ledford has acquired a provisional patent on a fuel mixture he says will dramatically reduce the amount of noxious emissions from automotive engines.


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  • John Mullinix of Ledford has acquired a provisional patent on a fuel mixture he says will dramatically reduce the amount of noxious emissions from automotive engines.
    The mixture is simple: One ounce of diesel fuel per 10 gallons of gasoline.
    Mullinix has reports from John A. Logan College and Southern Illinois University on vehicles tested using his formula that indicate significant declines in hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide.
    The study at SIU involved a Ford F-150 pickup truck.
    Hydrocarbon emissions -- unburned fuel in the form of carbon soot responsible for smog -- after flowing through a catalytic converter tested at 21.700 parts per million with gasoline. That same gasoline with the 1 oz. of diesel added tested at 10.005 parts per million -- a 51 percent hydrocarbon emission reduction.
    "There is a more complete burn of carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide and hydrocarbons with a catalytic converter," Mullinix said.
    Mullinix has been using the mixture in his own vehicles for nearly two years, having stumbled upon it in trying to make a vehicle operate on hydrogen, a method he abandoned because he decided the risk of explosion was too great. Mullinix is trained in fueling systems have worked in pyrotechnics and rocket propellants for Universal Match Corporation and for McDonnell Aircraft Corporation working with the Apollo Space Program.
    He says the driver using his fuel mixture will notice there is more pep during acceleration, a slight gain in gas mileage and less need for cleaning the exhaust system.
    "This is a cleaning method for the entire exhaust system," Mullinix said.
    Mullinix's provisional patent explains the process this way: The gasoline has oxygen atoms in the molecules within diesel fuel lending to better ignition for the combustion with the gasoline engine. This gasoline combustion with the exhaust carbon soot traces into the catalytic converter causing high temperature flashes that burn the oxides continuously along with the upstream flow of oxygen through the tailpipe from the outside atmosphere depending on the fire's demand within the catalytic converter.
    Mullinix hopes oil companies take note of his findings and produce cleaner-burning gasoline using his method, but is not optimistic.

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