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The Daily Register - Harrisburg, IL
Diana Boggia has a masters degree in education and writes about all kinds of parenting issues.
Who’s this teenager in my house?
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About this blog
By Diana Boggia
Diana Boggia has a masters degree in education with licensure in preschool, elementary and special education. She taught children with multiple disabilities for 15 years and has been working with parents (families) with behavioral concerns for more ...
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Your Perfect Child
Diana Boggia has a masters degree in education with licensure in preschool, elementary and special education. She taught children with multiple disabilities for 15 years and has been working with parents (families) with behavioral concerns for more than 23 years. She develops individualized strategies to build self esteem and diminish negative, attention-seeking behaviors for each child to be successful in achieving remarkable results. Throughout her work with parents Diana has developed a program that includes hands-on materials encompassing limit-setting, developing structure with schedules, teaching time management, increasing listening skills and parenting with incentives, rather than threats. These successful strategies have changed the dynamics of many families who were struggling with their child¹s behaviors.
Recent Posts
June 13, 2014 11:10 p.m.
May 11, 2014 11:10 a.m.
March 15, 2014 11:20 a.m.
Feb. 16, 2014 12:01 a.m.
Feb. 4, 2014 12:01 a.m.
June 24, 2013 12:01 a.m.



Raising children through their adolescent years can be a struggle for the parents, as well as for their teen. Teens truly believe that they are fully mature and can handle any responsibility. They hone their negotiation skills and debate their point until victory is achieved. Some teens do exhibit good, common sense, and associate themselves with levelheaded friends who also use good judgement. Most, however, have an unrealistic sense of infallibility. They are impulsive and inconsiderate, believe they are indestructible and often get involved with risky behavior. They believe that they can never get hurt or caught, yet often find find themselves in dangerous situations. This thinking comes from the amygdala, which guides us to fight, flight or freeze. Their frontal cortex lobe, which is still developing, guides us to reason rather than react. So, when your teen begs you for opportunities which are unreasonable, just remember, he’s talking like a toddler, straight from his amygdala. Read the entire article “Who is this young adult in my home”?

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